On Friday, December 21st (just after a a Pennsylvania man shot and killed three individuals, wounded three State Troopers, and then killed himself) Wayne LaPierre, CEO of the National Rifle Association, delivered a prepared statement regarding the school shooting in Newtown, Conn. A complete transcript of the statement is available here, but the video of LaPierre’s remarks better reflects his disposition, and the mood in the room.

Parents Against Gun Violence have issued our this response to the NRA statement:

“NRA CEO Wayne LaPierre identifies violent video games and inadequate mental healthcare as contributing factors to school shootings, and concludes with a call on Congress to place armed guards in every school in the country. He says ‘The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun.’ Unfortunately, the armed campus police force at Virginia Tech were unable to stop Seung-Hui Cho from shooting 59 people there; the armed school police officer Neil Gardner was unable to stop Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold from killing 13 at Columbine. And at Fort Hood, 40,000 American soldiers were unable to stop one man with a handgun before he had shot 42 people. The idea of armed guards protecting schools is not a new one; it has been tried and it has proven ineffective against well armed murderers. We are not opposed to guards in schools, but we believe a more comprehensive solution is necessary.”

Below is the video of the NRA statement:

2 Comments

  1. Meredith Swett Walker

    Nice response. I did not know that there were armed officers at VT and Columbine. I agree that armed officers at schools might be part of a solution, but it is not a whole solution. And yes, we should discuss the appropriateness of violent video games and media, but again that is only part of a more comprehensive solution.

  2. The line between the NRA and the gun industry is almost nonexistent. They are concerned with increasing the market for selling more guns.
    Do we want our schools to look and feel like mini-prisons?
    Do we want guns a part of what kids experience on a daily basis?
    Other countries have addressed gun violence effectively with responsible gun control laws. We can do the same.
    Australia is a good example. http://www.npr.org/2012/12/21/167814684/australians-urge-u-s-to-look-at-their-gun-laws